ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS: 011 462 9322 / 074 580 6040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
Copyright © Al Prodgers Comedy
ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
CONTACT US ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS: 011 462 9322   074 580 6040   info@alprodgers.co.za   www.alprodgers.co.za
FOLLOW US Visit our social profiles for regular tweets and posts

Professional Speaker Association of SA
Professional Member of
FOLLOW US

Free Access to Al's Communication Tools to have "Constructive Conversations":

A bi-weekly emailer with practical tips & techniques to Build Better Business!

09 April 2018 Speaking Volumes: A few simple audibility tips to get the best result from a speaking opportunity: So many top executives ignore one simple, but vital component without which their corporate event just becomes an exercise in flushing money down the drain… The microphone. A phenomenal amount of thought and work has gone into creating your corporate event. You’ve made the effort to select that perfect getaway venue for your group, carefully chosen the cutting edge design and blended it with sophisticated décor to enhance your message. Soon it will be your turn to communicate with your employees, partners or clients. As a topflight executive, this is your opportunity to let the audience know why they should have confidence in your leadership, it’s time to honour the hard work put in by your dedicated team and inspire everyone to even greater success in the future. So why am I, your comic MC for this prestigious event, standing on the periphery, gritting my teeth in frustration? Because many top executives ignore the one simple, but vital component without which the occasion just becomes an exercise in flushing money down the drain. The microphone. It’s not that the mic has been forgotten or is broken. The mic is operational, switched on and waiting. I know, because as MC I’ve been using it throughout the function to keep proceedings flowing smoothly, energise the audience and reinforce your messaging. The mic is lying unused, because the most important speaker of the event has chosen to be inaudible. Neglecting or refusing to use a microphone does not make you a plain-spoken, no-nonsense, man-of-the-people type CEO. It makes you background noise. And yes, I’m afraid it’s usually men who spurn the mic. Female executives hardly ever make this mistake and, as a result, their communication is often quantum leaps clearer than their male counterparts. I don’t know why men do this, but I suspect it’s the speechmaker’s equivalent of not asking for directions. And we all know how well that usually works out for us, guys. Some execs have expressed a reluctance to use a microphone, because they think they lack “microphone technique”. Luckily modern mics are so much more efficient, easy to use and unobtrusive than before. You don’t need to use a hand-held or a lapel mic anymore. Your sound technician should be able to provide you with a headset that comprises of an almost invisible wire that loops over one ear, lays flat along your cheek and is tipped with a microphone the size of a cotton ear bud. You can even use it comfortably if, like me, you wear spectacles. Pop the small battery pack into your pocket and you’re good to go. After a few seconds you wont even feel it. If the technician isn’t able to provide you with the choice of microphone that you find comfortable, use a different technical company. Modern short attention span audiences are another reason why it’s imperative that you use a mic. You may see yourself as a general marshalling his troops… that often reminds me of this famous photo of General Eisenhower speaking to soldiers about to take part in the D day invasion. Eisenhower is the epitome of a blunt, tough leader. The photo perfectly captures the enormity of the occasion and the high stakes involved. But he’s actually reaching about a dozen men. Twelve. Out of an invasion force of three million! Although it’s a great propaganda pic, it’s not exactly the most efficient way to communicate. And if you look again at the photo, you’ll see that in those days, nobody had a smart phone. Today, any speaker has mere seconds to grab and hold his audience’s attention before their phone comes out of their pocket and your corporate event becomes a very expensive opportunity for everyone except you to check what’s happening on their Facebook time line. Social media, email, etc. are ubiquitous, seductive and loud. Be louder. Every smart phone is potentially a powerful distraction. And you have only your wits and the power of your voice to compete. You need to use every competitive advantage you have available. So use a microphone, even if you are speaking to a smallish group. As a rule of thumb, if there are more people in the room than you have around your dining room table, use a mic. Remember, you don’t just need to be heard, you voice has to fill the room, physically, but also psychologically and emotionally. You need to accomplish all of this effortlessly, without shouting or straining, without worrying about audibility, so that you can devote all your attention to what you’re saying, not how it’s sounding. Besides, even if there are only a few people present, if you’ve gone to all this trouble to set up an event for them, I’m guessing they’re all pretty important to you, too important to leave audibility to chance. Here are a few simple audibility tips to get the best result from a speaking opportunity: Take a moment yourself or have your assistant brief the sound technician to make sure the mic is switched on, not muted, and that the channel is opened as you take your first steps on stage, so that when you want to, you simply begin to speak. Speak naturally, as if you are not using a microphone. Let the sound technician adjust levels to get your voice just right. You have enough to think about without worrying about changing the way you speak. It’s also very important to insist that the technical team uses fresh, fully charged batteries in the microphone. Take the trouble to insist and any professional will be happy to comply. There is no advantage to be gained by tapping the mic, blowing into it or plaintively enquiring “Is this on?” You don’t see Barack Obama doing it, so don’t do it either. It’s great if you can walk around and speak extemporaneously, but often the occasion calls for you to refer to notes, so use them openly and without excuses. It’s much better to be at a podium and have your facts straight than to wander around blithering nonsense. (That’s my job!) If you really hate the idea of paper notes that rattle in your hands as you speak, why not use a small tablet computer? My iPad Mini is just the right size and I have downloaded a free app that has an autocue function. If necessary, I can scroll through a long script automatically or with a flick of a thumb. It looks professional, it’s up to date and if an attack of speaker’s nerves gets the better of you, a tablet doesn’t betray you with the sight of a trembling sheaf of shuffling paper. Feel free to chat to your MC about any concerns or special requirements you may have. Is the tone right? Would you like it to be more serious or light- hearted, more energised or calm? Do you want to be introduced in a particular way? Should certain information be included or avoided? I am here to help make your event a success and to give you every opportunity to be the best speaker of the day. Use your MC, but please also use the mic. For stand-up comedy and MC duties at your next event, please feel free to call Al Prodgers at 011 462 9322 or 074 680 5060.
AL PRODGERS BLOG
Champagne glasses
AL PRODGERS BLOG
ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
Copyright © Al Prodgers Comedy
CONTACT ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS: e: info@alprodgers.co.za t: +27114629322 / +27745806040
FOLLOW US Visit our social profiles for regular tweets and posts
  
Professional Speaker Association of SA
Professional Member of
FOLLOW US
09 April 2018 Speaking Volumes: A few simple audibility tips to get the best result from a speaking opportunity: So many top executives ignore one simple, but vital component without which their corporate event just becomes an exercise in flushing money down the drain… The microphone. A phenomenal amount of thought and work has gone into creating your corporate event. You’ve made the effort to select that perfect getaway venue for your group, carefully chosen the cutting edge design and blended it with sophisticated décor to enhance your message. Soon it will be your turn to communicate with your employees, partners or clients. As a topflight executive, this is your opportunity to let the audience know why they should have confidence in your leadership, it’s time to honour the hard work put in by your dedicated team and inspire everyone to even greater success in the future. So why am I, your comic MC for this prestigious event, standing on the periphery, gritting my teeth in frustration? Because many top executives ignore the one simple, but vital component without which the occasion just becomes an exercise in flushing money down the drain. The microphone. It’s not that the mic has been forgotten or is broken. The mic is operational, switched on and waiting. I know, because as MC I’ve been using it throughout the function to keep proceedings flowing smoothly, energise the audience and reinforce your messaging. The mic is lying unused, because the most important speaker of the event has chosen to be inaudible. Neglecting or refusing to use a microphone does not make you a plain-spoken, no-nonsense, man-of-the-people type CEO. It makes you background noise. And yes, I’m afraid it’s usually men who spurn the mic. Female executives hardly ever make this mistake and, as a result, their communication is often quantum leaps clearer than their male counterparts. I don’t know why men do this, but I suspect it’s the speechmaker’s equivalent of not asking for directions. And we all know how well that usually works out for us, guys. Some execs have expressed a reluctance to use a microphone, because they think they lack “microphone technique”. Luckily modern mics are so much more efficient, easy to use and unobtrusive than before. You don’t need to use a hand-held or a lapel mic anymore. Your sound technician should be able to provide you with a headset that comprises of an almost invisible wire that loops over one ear, lays flat along your cheek and is tipped with a microphone the size of a cotton ear bud. You can even use it comfortably if, like me, you wear spectacles. Pop the small battery pack into your pocket and you’re good to go. After a few seconds you wont even feel it. If the technician isn’t able to provide you with the choice of microphone that you find comfortable, use a different technical company. Modern short attention span audiences are another reason why it’s imperative that you use a mic. You may see yourself as a general marshalling his troops… that often reminds me of this famous photo of General Eisenhower speaking to soldiers about to take part in the D day invasion. Eisenhower is the epitome of a blunt, tough leader. The photo perfectly captures the enormity of the occasion and the high stakes involved. But he’s actually reaching about a dozen men. Twelve. Out of an invasion force of three million! Although it’s a great propaganda pic, it’s not exactly the most efficient way to communicate. And if you look again at the photo, you’ll see that in those days, nobody had a smart phone. Today, any speaker has mere seconds to grab and hold his audience’s attention before their phone comes out of their pocket and your corporate event becomes a very expensive opportunity for everyone except you to check what’s happening on their Facebook time line. Social media, email, etc. are ubiquitous, seductive and loud. Be louder. Every smart phone is potentially a powerful distraction. And you have only your wits and the power of your voice to compete. You need to use every competitive advantage you have available. So use a microphone, even if you are speaking to a smallish group. As a rule of thumb, if there are more people in the room than you have around your dining room table, use a mic. Remember, you don’t just need to be heard, you voice has to fill the room, physically, but also psychologically and emotionally. You need to accomplish all of this effortlessly, without shouting or straining, without worrying about audibility, so that you can devote all your attention to what you’re saying, not how it’s sounding. Besides, even if there are only a few people present, if you’ve gone to all this trouble to set up an event for them, I’m guessing they’re all pretty important to you, too important to leave audibility to chance. Here are a few simple audibility tips to get the best result from a speaking opportunity: Take a moment yourself or have your assistant brief the sound technician to make sure the mic is switched on, not muted, and that the channel is opened as you take your first steps on stage, so that when you want to, you simply begin to speak. Speak naturally, as if you are not using a microphone. Let the sound technician adjust levels to get your voice just right. You have enough to think about without worrying about changing the way you speak. It’s also very important to insist that the technical team uses fresh, fully charged batteries in the microphone. Take the trouble to insist and any professional will be happy to comply. There is no advantage to be gained by tapping the mic, blowing into it or plaintively enquiring “Is this on?” You don’t see Barack Obama doing it, so don’t do it either. It’s great if you can walk around and speak extemporaneously, but often the occasion calls for you to refer to notes, so use them openly and without excuses. It’s much better to be at a podium and have your facts straight than to wander around blithering nonsense. (That’s my job!) If you really hate the idea of paper notes that rattle in your hands as you speak, why not use a small tablet computer? My iPad Mini is just the right size and I have downloaded a free app that has an autocue function. If necessary, I can scroll through a long script automatically or with a flick of a thumb. It looks professional, it’s up to date and if an attack of speaker’s nerves gets the better of you, a tablet doesn’t betray you with the sight of a trembling sheaf of shuffling paper. Feel free to chat to your MC about any concerns or special requirements you may have. Is the tone right? Would you like it to be more serious or light-hearted, more energised or calm? Do you want to be introduced in a particular way? Should certain information be included or avoided? I am here to help make your event a success and to give you every opportunity to be the best speaker of the day. Use your MC, but please also use the mic. For stand-up comedy and MC duties at your next event, please feel free to call Al Prodgers at 011 462 9322 or 074 680 5060. Cheers, Al

Free Access to Al's

Communication Tools to have

"Constructive Conversations":

A bi-weekly emailer with practical tips & techniques to Build Better Business!