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Copyright © Al Prodgers Comedy
ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
CONTACT US ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS: 011 462 9322   074 580 6040   info@alprodgers.co.za   www.alprodgers.co.za
FOLLOW US Visit our social profiles for regular tweets and posts
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Professional Speaker Association of SA
Professional Member of
05 July 2018 GIVE YOUR STAFF PERMISSION TO EXCEED YOUR EXPECTATIONS. I’ve delivered my Constructive Conversations keynote and workshops to diverse groups, from 6 financial advisors to 600 restaurant managers at a time. For me, a highpoint is feeling the surge of energy in the room when people make the shift from passive audience members, just receiving information, to active participants in the process, feeding their individual energy into a common goal. It’s the moment when they realise that they are genuinely being invited to contribute their knowledge, skill and experience and that their colleagues are truly listening. I also love it when leaders approach me after a process and express their amazement that the most unlikely people have contributed with such passion and forcefulness. It’s powerful stuff. Unless you can get people to participate, all the training you’re giving is only empty rhetoric. Without involving them physically and emotionally, retention of facts is painfully low. Millennials especially, that important and ever growing component of your business, value authenticity and participation very highly. Here’s how to unlock the results you want: 1. Acknowledge Your People. There’s a vast amount of relevant wisdom stored inside people’s heads. Some call it institutional memory, but it’s much more. They are smarter and they care more than you think. Simply by acknowledging them and engaging in respectful communication, you will raise staff morale. In the USA, research has shown that billions of dollars are lost annually because of unengaged employees who do not believe they are valued. So acknowledge your people, not once a year at the office party, but continually, during each conversation.  2. Make Space for The Crazy. When people feel safe to contribute, they do so enthusiastically. Sometimes all that newly awakened energy can take you by surprise. It can feel overwhelming, distracting, even confusing as some ideas are way outside the company’s comfort zone. But, what may seem like the edge of sanity is often the cutting edge of creativity and innovation. Your task as leader in these situations is simply to say “Yes” to the wave and capture as much of it as possible. Write it down, no matter how messy or downright chaotic it seems at first. By giving this clumsy, creative phase enough time, you’ll have plenty to analyse and organise later. It’s much harder to do a feasibility study if you have nothing to study, so make space for the crazy, fringe ideas, they may prove to be the best of the bunch.  3. Let Authority Speak Last. In any meeting there will be different levels of expertise on any given subject. If an acknowledged expert or the team leader speaks in the early stages, the other people in the room will be far more reluctant to offer a dissenting view or even to contribute at all. We instinctively gravitate towards following the leader, meetings become echo chambers for the dominant viewpoint and the result is that the company ends up doing the same things in the same ways as before. Be genuinely curious, listen actively and consider all input. Then, and only then, respond.  4. Have a Little Faith. Management is often justifiably nervous of inviting participation, fearing that people will go off on tangents or miss the point. But remember how much power the leader has to shape and guide the conversation. By being open to opportunities, you actually enhance your status in a group and by showing that you are inclined towards new possibilities, you demonstrate that you are a real leader. It may be scary, but the alternative is much worse. When you believe that your people “just don’t get it”. When you stop expecting more from them, their performance will decline and keep declining to meet your perpetually falling expectations. What’s the point of wanting staff to work at their full potential… and then underestimating that potential? Have a little faith in your people. Be a bit playful. Listen. They’ll surprise you every time.   For more tips on how to get your workforce involved, see my previous blog posts and follow me on Twitter , Linkedin or Facebook. And please feel free to contact me with any questions and suggestions.  Al
FOLLOW US

Free Access to Al's Communication Tools to have "Constructive Conversations":

A bi-weekly emailer with practical tips & techniques to Build Better Business!

AL PRODGERS BLOG
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ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS:  0114629322 / 0745806040 / info@alprodgers.co.za
CONTACT ENQUIRIES / BOOKINGS: e: info@alprodgers.co.za t: +27114629322 /
FOLLOW US Visit our social profiles for regular tweets and posts
Professional Speaker Association of SA
Professional Member of
05 July 2018 GIVE YOUR STAFF PERMISSION TO EXCEED YOUR EXPECTATIONS. I’ve delivered my Constructive Conversations keynote and workshops to diverse groups, from 6 financial advisors to 600 restaurant managers at a time. For me, a highpoint is feeling the surge of energy in the room when people make the shift from passive audience members, just receiving information, to active participants in the process, feeding their individual energy into a common goal. It’s the moment when they realise that they are genuinely being invited to contribute their knowledge, skill and experience and that their colleagues are truly listening. I also love it when leaders approach me after a process and express their amazement that the most unlikely people have contributed with such passion and forcefulness. It’s powerful stuff. Unless you can get people to participate, all the training you’re giving is only empty rhetoric. Without involving them physically and emotionally, retention of facts is painfully low. Millennials especially, that important and ever growing component of your business, value authenticity and participation very highly. Here’s how to unlock the results you want: 1. Acknowledge Your People. There’s a vast amount of relevant wisdom stored inside people’s heads. Some call it institutional memory, but it’s much more. They are smarter and they care more than you think. Simply by acknowledging them and engaging in respectful communication, you will raise staff morale. In the USA, research has shown that billions of dollars are lost annually because of unengaged employees who do not believe they are valued. So acknowledge your people, not once a year at the office party, but continually, during each conversation.  2. Make Space for The Crazy. When people feel safe to contribute, they do so enthusiastically. Sometimes all that newly awakened energy can take you by surprise. It can feel overwhelming, distracting, even confusing as some ideas are way outside the company’s comfort zone. But, what may seem like the edge of sanity is often the cutting edge of creativity and innovation. Your task as leader in these situations is simply to say “Yes” to the wave and capture as much of it as possible. Write it down, no matter how messy or downright chaotic it seems at first. By giving this clumsy, creative phase enough time, you’ll have plenty to analyse and organise later. It’s much harder to do a feasibility study if you have nothing to study, so make space for the crazy, fringe ideas, they may prove to be the best of the bunch.  3. Let Authority Speak Last. In any meeting there will be different levels of expertise on any given subject. If an acknowledged expert or the team leader speaks in the early stages, the other people in the room will be far more reluctant to offer a dissenting view or even to contribute at all. We instinctively gravitate towards following the leader, meetings become echo chambers for the dominant viewpoint and the result is that the company ends up doing the same things in the same ways as before. Be genuinely curious, listen actively and consider all input. Then, and only then, respond.  4. Have a Little Faith. Management is often justifiably nervous of inviting participation, fearing that people will go off on tangents or miss the point. But remember how much power the leader has to shape and guide the conversation. By being open to opportunities, you actually enhance your status in a group and by showing that you are inclined towards new possibilities, you demonstrate that you are a real leader. It may be scary, but the alternative is much worse. When you believe that your people “just don’t get it”. When you stop expecting more from them, their performance will decline and keep declining to meet your perpetually falling expectations. What’s the point of wanting staff to work at their full potential… and then underestimating that potential? Have a little faith in your people. Be a bit playful. Listen. They’ll surprise you every time.   For more tips on how to get your workforce involved, see my previous blog posts and follow me on Twitter , Linkedin or Facebook. And please feel free to contact me with any questions and suggestions.  Al
FOLLOW US

Free Access to Al's

Communication Tools to have

"Constructive Conversations":

A bi-weekly emailer with practical tips & techniques to Build Better Business!
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